Friday, July 22, 2016

Here's a newspaper's anecdotal evidence of ABA-induced trauma: Terri Du Bous, the next emancipated Applied Behavioural Analysis (ABA) Judge Rotenberg Center (JRC) survivor, speaks.

My friends, peers, colleagues, and allies,

She is free of Canton, Massachusetts' Applied Behavior Analy$i$ (ABA) damaging skin shock falsely speaking and misleading profiteers and now she’s talking!

Next courageous ABA/JRC skin shock "torturers" whistleblowing survivor Terri Du Bous. Pic source Adams (2016)


Du Bois could join the ranks of JRC survivor-litigants, along with Andre McCollins (settled for an undisclosed amount) ...

Anyhow, here's the news. Investigative reporter Heather Adams (July 22, 2016) said in MassLive.com:
Many disability advocates, former students, parents and former staff members have worked to stop the use of the electric shock devices for years — in some cases, even decades.... The FDA confirmed JRC is the only institution in the U.S. that still uses aversive electric therapy. The organization proposed a ban on these devices in April, and the comment period for that proposal ends Monday, July 25.... Terri Du Bois was 17 when she tried to commit suicide… The hospital spoke to her parents and recommended that she move from upstate New York to Massachusetts to attend JRC.... The hospital spoke to her parents and recommended that she move from upstate New York to Massachusetts to attend JRC.... After Du Bois' hospital stay, her parents told her about JRC, but she said they didn't give her a choice about going. The school, she said, was presented like college, which sounded like a good option anyway.... 'But when I got there,' she said, 'it was like military.'... (JRC’s) shock device known as a Graduated Electronic Decelerator, or GED, is the most notorious tool JRC uses, but aversive therapies covers a wide range of methods, including restraint boards.... The shock device known as a Graduated Electronic Decelerator, or GED, is the most notorious tool JRC uses, but aversive therapies covers a wide range of methods, including restraint boards…. In 2005, early on in her time at JRC, Du Bois was sitting in class and needed to re-situate her pants. Her natural reaction was to stand up and fix them.
Adams (2016) can tell the rest of Du Bois’ story as she uncovers it in her Massachusetts online newspaper.












Second ABA/JRC Director Mrs. Glenda Crookes


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