Saturday, April 23, 2016

Here's Reward and Consent's (R+C's) Cognitive Behavioural Teaching (CBT) amended Serenity Prayer.

Michelangelo: Creation of Eve

Here is the original Serenity Prayer as probably written by American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr:
God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.
Wisdom is the hardest part to learn. It comes with age, through trial and error between the acceptance and the courage parts, carried out in order to learn from feedback whether or not a change in a certain situation was warranted. It comes with ethical and psychological analyses and with study and contemplation.

Here is the Reward and Consent Cognitive Behavioral Ethics amendment:
God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, wisdom to know the difference, and wisdom to know the things I should not change even if I could.
I believe we all possess the fortitude to solve enormous cases of injustice, and we should do so when we find the energy. Much of this involves keeping a keen lookout for the good things in life and then to dwell in them and to praise them authentically, though not to change them, for who needs to change the Good?

After all, this is what I do as I set out to help break the world's addiction to punishment run amok, even if I may not see the changes in my lifetime. See the introduction to this blog, please, over in the right-hand column of the stable section of the landing page.

It should go without saying, what Applied Behavioral Analysis (Analy$i$) ABA fails to grasp, is that 1) if you set out to modify someone else's behavior, you always need the consent of the recipient of the mod, whether or not it's a fully informed consent, and furthermore, 2) any behavior modifier must always consent to reasonable attempts by others, no matter how cognizant and able the counter-controllers happen to be or not to be, to modify their behaviors in return. ABA doesn't get the second maxim either.

Just because we know how to obliterate cities with nuclear bombs in a so-called "effective" manner, that does not mean we ought to drop them. ABA assumes that we ought to change things, even when things are perfectly fine. Then it brags about how "effective" it is in making us pass as non-autistics. ABA does conversion therapy to gays. Gays hate it. It's the same thing with ABA's "autistic conversion therapy."

ABA: listen to us autistics. Go away and leave us alone. Change yourselves!

*****

Directly related posts:

Anna Kosovskaya escapes the Judge Rotenberg Center of Applied Behavior Analysis electroshock "treatment/torture": Anna's self-reported adventures with interviewer analysis.

Applied Behavior Analysis is abusive. Reward and Consent's Cognitive Behavioral Method is a viable alternative.

Applied Behavior Analysis (Analy$i$) never learns. It officially approved electroshock torture once again.

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sent is not responsible for links on the site. For example, I use keywords "Operant Conditioning" in the YouTube search field for the videos displayed below the archives on the left. Google selects the videos and the results change from time to time. Please email me if anything is not educational and germane to the subject and I will reevaluate the search.

I am an advocate for people with disabilities certified to teach special education with a Master of Arts in Teaching. I am not a Licensed Psychologist or a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. When in doubt, seek the advice of an MD, a PhD, or a BCBA. My ability to analyze the ethics of ABA stems from the fact that I am disabled and ABA interventions are often done to people like me, which I voluntarily accept, but only when I alone am the person granting consent, and not a parent, sibling, guardian, or institution.